Monday, June 14, 2010

Diagnosing Mary

Back around the end of May, I posted a review of the very popular book “The Unnamed” by Joshua Ferris. I was never able to decide whether I loved this book or not, but it did lodge itself into my mind for weeks. What would it be like to be afflicted with a disease or a neurosis that had no name? Without a name, you would not be able to receive adequate medical assistance, find comfort from others suffering from the same issue, and always be on a mission to find answers.

This predicament touched me personally, and is probably why the book stayed with me all this time. I have two friends with children that are suffering from an “unnamed” affliction. I watch them, year after year, searching for answers, searching for the right medications, the right schools. I am constantly in awe of my friends’ strength and determination to do right by their children. One of these friends, Marianne, recently decided to start her own blog, in hopes of finding others like her, and for some good old-fashioned therapy of getting her hopes and frustrations out of her head and in print.

Marianne’s daughter Mary has had her issues since birth. It started with speech and physical delays, and progressed from there. Does she have Austism? Aspergers? OCD? Hypotonia? ADHD? Not exactly, but she has symptoms of each. She is a happy, kind and loving child, but she suffers from anxieties, has no ability for even simple math, and doesn’t understand socially acceptable behavior.

If you know someone out there that might be interested in Marianne’s journey with her daughter Mary, or are interested yourself, head on over to her blog Diagnosing Mary. I know Marianne would greatly appreciate the support!

12 comments:

Jackie (Farm Lane Books) said...

My son has recently been diagnosed with Aspergers. Being able to put a name on his condition was so helpful to me as it meant we could finally start working on some solutions. Having an 'unnamed' condition must be really hard. I have great sympathy for all those affected. *heads off to offer support on Mary's blog*

Literary Feline said...

As someone who has had to deal with that sort of issue from a medical side, I can appreciate how frustrating having an unnamed condition can be. Although, I imagine it is even worse for a parent struggling to meet the needs of his or her child. I hope that Marianne finds the answers she is looking for.

Zibilee said...

I imagine this is tremendously troubling for your friend. I know that when we were trying to diagnose my daughter's emotional issues we were constantly being bombarded with information, good and bad. I am going to be checking out this blog and offering my support. I know how hard it can be when your child is different. I wish her much success with her daughter and will be praying for her family.

Trisha said...

What a struggle! Knowing is half the battle after all, so to suffer without answers must be painfully difficult.

Kathleen said...

I can't imagine not knowing. To me that would be THE most frustrating thing. If I think of anyone that might be able to help I will forward them the link. It's too bad that TV shows like House make these medical mysteries look like they can be solved so quickly when in fact they can't.

Jenners said...

This must be incredibly frustrating and difficult for your friend and her daughter. I wish her the best of luck in finding a way to help her child.

Darlene said...

I just wanted to say my prayers are with your friends. I know just how awful health issues can be and how hard it is to find help.

Alice Teh said...

Not knowing what it is can be really frustrating. I hope Marianne finds the answers she's looking for. My thoughts and prayers go to her.

Alyce said...

I have added her feed to my reader so that I can keep up with it too. Thanks for sharing it with us.

ds said...

Oh, that face! I want to give her a big hug. Best of luck to Marianne. Her determination will pay off, soon I hope. Thank you for sharing.

Beth F said...

My heart goes out to her!

diaryofaneccentric said...

I can't even imagine being in her shoes. I really feel for her and her family. That must be really tough, not knowing.

--Anna